SUBSCRIBE NOW! Don't Miss Anything We Post. Join Our Email List Today.

How to Do a Dyno in Indoor Climbing | Rock Climbing

SHARING IS CARING!
Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterPin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0



Rockin’ Rock Climbing Commodities
Momentum Climbing Harness: http://amzn.to/1iN4Caq
La Sportiva Tarantulace Men’s Climbing Shoe: http://amzn.to/1FL2Qvz
La Sportiva Tarantulace Women’s Climbing Shoe: http://amzn.to/1UTo5SH
Half Dome Climbing Helmet: http://amzn.to/1QfLxZ8
Chalk Bag with Belt and Zippered Pocket: http://amzn.to/1OtW84a
REVERSO 4 Belay Device: http://amzn.to/1F170Vi

Watch more How to Rock Climb videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512702-How-to-Do-a-Dyno-in-Indoor-Climbing-Rock-Climbing

When you’re climbing, one move you might also need to do is something called a Dino. A Dino is a very powerful move that requires a whole lot of power that you’re going to generate from your legs. Basically, what is going to happen is you’re going to jump from one position to the second, releasing sometimes both hands and both feet, or sometimes just both of your feet. The critical point is that it’s a jump motion, so you are really generating a lot of force to get from one position into another.

One example of a Dino would be how to solve the problem of getting from this hold all the way over to this hold when they’re too apart for me to reach. To execute the Dino, you want to think about initiating that motion from your legs, jumping to create that force, and looking at your target. Part of what makes a Dino work and fail is the timing involved with how you really initiate that move with pushing, the timing of when you release those hands, and things like that.

An example would be jumping this way. That would be a Dino. As I was leaving the footholds, I’m pressing with my legs to make my body move in the direction I’m headed. If you’re moving straight up, part of the timing issue is being able to release those hands at just the right moment so you’re body’s moving up and not out. In this example, since I was jumping sideways, part of that motion was releasing at just at the right time to be aiming towards that blue hold and not straight up or straight out.

Another example of a Dino is this one here, where in order to get from these two starting holds all the way out to this big purple hold, I’ll need to use a Dino because the holds are too far apart for me to reach while keeping my feet on the wall. Once again, it’s very dynamic, very powerful, you’re going to be jumping from one position into another. It requires a lot of commitment. You have to be willing to really let go of the wall. At this point, all four appendages are going to be off the wall, and you’re going to be jumping grabbing that next hold. Be prepared to grab it and pull in on it. This is what it’s going to look like.

That’s another example of a Dino. Also, still using the same timing to make sure that I’m releasing those hand holds at just the right time so my body’s going to be jumping at the right direction. I’m ready and committed to doing the move. I’m going to leave those feet. I’m going to be in the air for a second. When you grab that next hold, just hold on. And that would be how to do a Dino.

source

Free Mini-Course and Weekly Updates!

Signup now and receive our Rock Climbing Mini-Course and weekly updates when we publish new content.

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

SHARING IS CARING!
Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterPin on Pinterest0Share on Reddit0

Leave a Reply